Worked Example Sreencast

I created this worked example screencast for 3rd grade students. All 3rd grade students receive Chromebooks at the beginning of each year. I thought this worked example would be beneficial for them as an introduction and/or refresher on Google Drive. Students are introduced to Google Drive in 2nd grade, but they have extremely limited experience because they don’t receive their own Chromebooks until 3rd grade. I chose to review the icons of Google Drive, Gmail, and Chrome at the beginning of the video so that they would be able to transfer knowledge more effectively during the instrucitonal video. I chunked the video into three parts: Accessing Google Drive, Navigating within Google Drive, and Creating a document.

AECT Guidelines (2012)

2.1 Creating – Candidates apply content pedagogy to create appropriate applications of processes and technologies to improve learning and performance outcomes. (p. 1)

2.2 Using – Candidates implement appropriate educational technologies and processes based on appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 141)

2.4 Managing – Candidates manage appropriate technological processes and resources to provide supportive learning communities, create flexible and diverse learning environments, and develop and demonstrate appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 175-193)

3.1 Creating – Candidates create instructional design products based on learning principles and research-based best practices. (pp. 8, 243-245, 246)

3.2 Using – Candidates make professionally sound decisions in selecting appropriate processes and resources to provide optimal conditions for learning (pp. 122, 169) based on principles, theories, and effective practices. (pp. 8-9, 168-169, 246)

3.5 Ethics – Candidates foster a learning environment in which ethics guide practice that promotes health, safety, best practice (p. 246), and respect for copyright, Fair Use, and appropriate open access to resources. (p. 3)

3.6 Diversity of Learners – Candidates foster a learning community that empowers learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. (p. 10)

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Why I Left Music Education

I really enjoyed making this story because the content was so personal to me. For the past 13 years, I have poured my life into music education. Teaching children music through exploration, play, and experience has always been important to me as a teacher. I strongly believe that I gave all children (no matter their skill level),  an opportunity to contribute to our music creation. As the years went by, music education in my district became less about teaching young children to love music, and more about getting students ready for the next music assessment. I struggle with this because I believe students are already over tested and I took pride in the fact that students would at least have 1 class/day (music) to be creative. I have found that kids just want to learn music by doing music…singing and playing…and through this experience skills are taught and mastered. Well, I had to take a break from music education because I couldn’t teach children the way they wanted me to teach. I lost all passion for teaching music. In terms of the personalization principle, I chose to narrate my story with just my voice (conversational) and pictures because I didn’t want the music to be distracting. I tried to speak in a way that demonstrated my personal feelings of sadness and frustration. Many of the images are from my own classroom and I worked hard not to over do it with the pictures. Through these pictures and narration, I tried to show a music curriculum that was very active, fun, engaging, and overall child-centered. I definitely see the value in story-telling with children. Through this process, I learned that creating a digital story is pretty easy and could be used for a variety of purposes in a classroom for educational purposes. I envision creating a class digital story and sharing with families. By doing, children would get a neat experience with using tech tools and programs to create the story, but also the power of the Internet for sharing and collaboration. I hope you enjoy my story. Matt

AECT Guidelines (2012)

2.1 Creating – Candidates apply content pedagogy to create appropriate applications of processes and technologies to improve learning and performance outcomes. (p. 1)

2.2 Using – Candidates implement appropriate educational technologies and processes based on appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 141)

2.4 Managing – Candidates manage appropriate technological processes and resources to provide supportive learning communities, create flexible and diverse learning environments, and develop and demonstrate appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 175-193)

3.1 Creating – Candidates create instructional design products based on learning principles and research-based best practices. (pp. 8, 243-245, 246)

3.2 Using – Candidates make professionally sound decisions in selecting appropriate processes and resources to provide optimal conditions for learning (pp. 122, 169) based on principles, theories, and effective practices. (pp. 8-9, 168-169, 246)

3.5 Ethics – Candidates foster a learning environment in which ethics guide practice that promotes health, safety, best practice (p. 246), and respect for copyright, Fair Use, and appropriate open access to resources. (p. 3)

3.6 Diversity of Learners – Candidates foster a learning community that empowers learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities. (p. 10)

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Coherence Analysis

What is the Coherence Principle and its most important constraints/criteria?

The coherence principle is the weeding out of unnecessary information: Both visual and auditory contained within e-learning. To apply the coherence principle presenters must avoid extraneous words, text, and graphics. Research has shown that by avoiding extraneous words, text, and graphics and sticking closely to the instructional objectives with a “less is more” approach, students will learn and attain more information (Mayer, Bove, Bryman, Mars, and Tapangco (1996, p. 64).

Describe and/or include one example of successful and one example of unsuccessful attempts to apply the Coherence Principle in actual instruction and training you have experienced, especially as it might be implemented in PowerPoint-based instruction and training. Have you ever seen this principle violated or abused? Identify the violations, including citations as needed from your textbook.

Recently, I attended a virtual training for district instructional technology leaders. The presenter applied coherence principles to her Google Slides presentation. Her slides were designed with minimal text providing key points to the audience backing  up her slides with oral presentation. She followed the contiguity principle by placing graphics (not extraneous) near the text on the slides. Her graphics were basic, simple and relevant to the learning taking place. As Clark and Mayer (2011) state “we have several research studies in which a simpler graphic led to better learning than a more realistic or complex visual”  (p. 164). Because the presenter followed these coherence principles, I was able to learn more effectively and make connections.

On the other hand, I have seen presentations that don’t apply coherence principles. Many of the presentations I see are especially extraneous in text. Mayer and Jackson (2005) point out that quantitative text actually distracts learners (2005, p. 13). For me personally, if I see a slide with extraneous text, I tune the slide out because I am unable process that much information visually. Or, If I attempt to process the slide may, I then have trouble processing verbally what the presenter is saying because of sensory overload. Another aspect of the coherence principle that I see overlooked often is adding extraneous or fluff graphics to presentations. I have learned through the readings and my own experience, that extraneous or fluff-type graphics distract and hurt learning.

Discuss the relationship of the Coherence Principle to other Multimedia Learning Principles examined thus far in your readings.

I think the most important revelation I have learned from reading about the different multimedia principles is the importance of creating presentations with learning objectives in mind. All e-learning should be focused on what you want the learners to know from the presentation. Whether it be the principle of multimedia, contiguity, modality, redundancy, or coherence, you should ask yourself if what you are adding (graphics, text, words, etc) will help to achieve the instructional goals. If not, do not add them – less is more.

Discuss the relationship of the Coherence Principle to fundamental theories of psychology as described by Clark & Mayer in your textbook.

The arousal theory of motivation as it relates to the coherence principle states that we learn better when we are emotionally aroused through exciting graphics, video clips, etc. However, this doesn’t necessarily hold true in e-learning. As learners we need to make connections and if we are having trouble making coherent mental representation of the presented learning because of extraneous text and graphics, we are not emotionally aroused. However, if we apply coherence principles to our presentations, learners are more aroused because they are successful in making connections and interpreting the presented learning.

What do you personally like or dislike about this principle? Present a coherent, informed opinion and explain why you hold this opinion. Are there any limitations or qualifications of the principle (caveats) which the authors did not consider and, if so, what are they?

For the most part I agree with the coherence principle. As an elementary teacher, I believe that unnecessary text, graphics, and words will distract kids. Everyday in my classroom I see first-hand how kids can easily be distracted. My question for the authors, is whether they have tried researching the coherence principle with younger learners? All the research results quoted in the text is with older learners. Most published instructional materials or curriculum geared for elementary aged learners have more graphics that are seemingly more exciting and engaging. Why do publishers do this? I wonder if having more of these types of graphics help to keep younger-aged students more engaged? I definitely believe extraneous text would lose young learners’ attention, but what about more graphics or even some fluff for them. I would love to see research on whether extraneous graphics would have the same negative impact on young learners as older? Would the results from the research vary based on the general age of students.

References

Clark, R., & Mayer, R. (2011). E-Learning and the science of instruction: Proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (3rd ed., p. 528). San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

Mayer, R.E., Bove, W., Bryman, A. Mars, R., & Tapangco, L. (1996). When less is more: Meaningful learning from visual and verbal summaries of science textbook lessons. Journal of Educational Psychology, 88,64-73

Mayer, R.E., & Anderson, R.B. (1992). The instructive animation: Helping students build connections between words and pictures in multimedia learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 84, 444-452

AECT Guidelines (2012)

2.1 Creating – Candidates apply content pedagogy to create appropriate applications of processes and technologies to improve learning and performance outcomes. (p. 1)

2.3 Assessing/Evaluating – Candidates demonstrate an inquiry process that assesses the adequacy of learning and evaluates the instruction and implementation of educational technologies and processes (p. 116-117) grounded in reflective practice.

3.2 Using – Candidates make professionally sound decisions in selecting appropriate processes and resources to provide optimal conditions for learning (pp. 122, 169) based on principles, theories, and effective practices. (pp. 8-9, 168-169, 246)

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EdTech 513 – “Composer Spotlight” Episode 1

Composer Spotlight is a Podcast series designed for an upper elementary audience. Each weekly episode spotlight’s a different composer, sharing biographical information along with listening examples of the composer’s music. Due to the limited instructional time with my students, I don’t spend a lot of time teaching about different composers and thought by providing this series, kids could have an opportunity to learn about different composers and their music. This first episode spotlights Mozart, his life, and two of his musical works: Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and Turkish March. I think this podcast would be a great flipped activity where the children listen to the Podcasts on their own and when they come back to class we can spend more time collectively digging deeper into the composer and his music. Click here to listen to the Podcast. 

AECT (2012)

2.1 Creating – Candidates apply content pedagogy to create appropriate applications of processes and technologies to improve learning and performance outcomes. (p. 1)

2.2 Using – Candidates implement appropriate educational technologies and processes based on appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 141)

2.4 Managing – Candidates manage appropriate technological processes and resources to provide supportive learning communities, create flexible and diverse learning environments, and develop and demonstrate appropriate content pedagogy. (p. 175-193)

3.2 Using – Candidates make professionally sound decisions in selecting appropriate processes and resources to provide optimal conditions for learning (pp. 122, 169) based on principles, theories, and effective practices. (pp. 8-9, 168-169, 246)

3.6 Diversity of Learners – Candidates foster a learning community that empowers learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities.

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Edtech 513, Project 1.

My first project in Edtech 513 is a presentation that teaches elementary students the concept of Netiquette. Now that young students are spending more and more time on the internet, teaching them aspects of digital citizenship like netiquette is vital. While making the presentation, I applied the principles of Contiguity. I placed graphics near words and made sure that they coresponded well. All text and corresponding pictures were on the same slide and not seperated. I spent a great deal of time trying to find quality free photos to use on the presentation that would convey the message of the slide. Below is the presentation.

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Week 4 Edtech 513 Reflection on Reading

I really enjoyed this week’s reading. I am really glad that the book for the couse is an easy read and not too dry. It is so hard to learn from boring bookssmile I also really enjoyed the videos because they recapped most of the reading this week, which helps me to retain the new information.

A lot of the reading this week made me reflect on my own powerpoint-type presentations. I ws reminded that selecting graphics to support the intended learning is important. In the past, I would sometimes add fluff graphics to a presentation and that I need to think more carefully about the types of graphics I use. A balance of words and pictures is key to successful learning. In chapter 4, really liked how Clark (2008) suggest that their are 5 different types of content and that each type of content has suggested graphic types. The chart on page 75 will help me re-think the way I incoporate graphics in presentations. In Chapter 5, I learned the principle of contiguity. Contiguity has 2 principles: Coordinate words and graphics together and the 2nd principle discusses how spoken words and graphics be synchronized. If one follows these principles, the learner will be able to process the new information more effectively increaseing engagment and achievement.

Clark, R., & Mayer, R. (2011). E-Learning and the science of instruction: Proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (3rd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer.

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Creating My Learning Log – Edtech 513

Creating an EdTech learning log for Boise State University has been a valuable experience becuse it allows me to share and reflect on some of the coursework that I have completed during my studies. In my opinion, one of the most valuable apsects of creating this learning log site, is that it provides a common place for me to post and other BSU colleagues to read, share, and respond to my work in constructive and meaningful ways. Having the opportunity to share knowledge amongst each other through the use of learning logs will benefit my instructional skills hopefully helping my students to achieve more. As an educator, I truly believe that continuous reflection promotes deep critical thinking about instructional pedagogy resulting in higher student achievement.

AECT Standard, 2.1 Creating–Candidates apply content pedagogy to create appropriate applications of processes and technologies to improve learning and performance outcomes.

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